Matt Pson Just another dead sysadmin blog

27Aug/11Off

NFS and Debian Squeeze followup

I previously wrote about some troubles with using a server running Debian Squeeze (6.0) with NFS. I'm now inclined to think that either the problem was fixed (a clean install of 6.0.2 does not have any of those problems) or that it was related to using an old server that probably was installed back in the Woody days and just 'apt-get dist-upgrade' from there. The fact that it (the server) worked well in general when upgraded from Woody to Squeeze, via Sarge, Etch and Lenny , is a great testament to how well Debian works imho.

16Apr/11Off

VMware Tools on Debian Squeeze (a short howto)

(this post is more of en extended memory, now I know where I have written this down 🙂 )

So, installing VMware Tools on a virtual machine running Debian Squeeze (6.0.1 in this case) is really comparable to a walk in the park. First, prepare your installation by installing even more packages required to build the kernel modules:

# apt-get install make gcc linux-headers-$(uname -r)

(this will install a whole bunch of packages needed depending on what you already installed before)

Next, select your virtual machine in your vSphere Client and right-click and select Guest->Install/Upgrade VMware tools. This will put a virtual CD into your virtual machines CD-rom drive (hopefully you didn't remove that, did you?). Next mount it, extract the VMware tools package to /tmp (or any other location of your choice):

# mount /media/cdrom
# cd /tmp
# tar xfz  /media/cdrom/VMwareTools*.tar.gz

Then it's time to build the tools and install them:

# cd vmware-tools-distrib
# ./vmware-install.pl

This will trigger a bunch of questions and while it is safe to accept the default on all of them I usually like to keep my non-Debian stuff in /usr/local rather than in /usr to avoid any future conflicts I change that (one of the first questions). When the installation is finished VMware ESX/ESXi can communicate with the virtual machine which is really handy and there is some other useful perks like the balloon driver and some custom vmware drivers.

After the installation I clean up after me:

# cd /tmp
# rm -rf vmware-tools.distrib
# umount /media/cdrom

All done and we're finished, just a quick check in the Summary tab in my vSphere Client tells me that my virtual machine now has VMware Tools installed.